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Scientists claim 5G mmWave technology could produce coronavirus in human cells

Illustration of the coronavirus.
(Image credit: n/a)

 A new paper published in Biolife, a scientific publisher of peer-reviewed journals, claims that a 5G millimeter wave could be “absorbed by dermatologic cells acting like antennas”, and thus be transferred to other cells, where they could produce coronaviruses in biological cells.

That’s right. A team of researchers is claiming that 5G could be absorbed by human ‘antenna’ cells, which could then go on to produce coronaviruses.

"In this research, we show that 5G millimeter waves could be absorbed by dermatologic cells acting like antennas, transferred to other cells and play the main role in producing Coronaviruses."

Biolife report.

“In this research, we show that 5G millimeter waves could be absorbed by dermatologic cells acting like antennas, transferred to other cells and play the main role in producing Coronaviruses in biological cells,” the research abstract explains. “The shapes of these waves are similar to shapes of hexagonal and pentagonal bases of their DNA source. These waves produce some holes in liquids within the nucleus. To fill these holes, some extra hexagonal and pentagonal bases are produced. These bases could join to each other and form virus-like structures such as Coronavirus.”

'You'll never be ready for this'

According to PubMed, the paper, titled ‘5G Technology and induction of coronavirus in skin cells’, was produced by a group of scientists with affiliations to the Department of Nuclear, Sub-nuclear and Radiation Physics, Guglielmo Marconi University; Central Michigan University; and the Department of Dermatology and Venereology at First Moscow State Medical University.

However, the paper was quickly rubbished online, though, as experts turned to social media to criticize it. Elisabeth Bik, an ex-Stanford science consultant who specializes in microbiome, science integrity, and image forensics, posted a series of tweets lambasting the paper. 

“They have published several papers on electromagnetic waves and that the chemical structure of DNA differs between males and females,” Bik said in a tweet. “In one paper, they claim that one can tell the gender of a fetus by infecting a pregnant woman by male or female influenza viruses. (Please don't do this! It is nonsense)," she went on to say.

"I invite everyone to rip this piece apart, and to urge NCBI to ban this journal to the far end of predatory territory.”

Elisabeth Bik, science consultant.

James Heathers, a research scientist at Northeastern University in Boston, shared the link on his Twitter account, and said, “You haven't seen the stupidest published SARS-CoV-2 take yet. I PROMISE you. No matter what's happened so far, no matter what you've seen, where you've looked, the best is yet to come. You'll never be ready for this. But here we go.”

According to Bik, most of the “extraordinary” claims made by the authors of the paper, past and present, had appeared in “predatory journals”. But she was shocked to find that the  latest work had appeared in an NCBI PubMed-indexed journal.

“I invite everyone to rip this piece apart,” Bik posted. “And to urge NCBI to ban this journal to the far end of predatory territory.”

Dan is a British journalist with 20 years of experience in the design and tech sectors, producing content for the likes of Microsoft, Adobe, Dell and The Sunday Times. In 2012 he helped launch the world's number one design blog, Creative Bloq. Dan is now editor-in-chief at 5Gradar, where he oversees news, insight and reviews, providing an invaluable resource for anyone looking to stay up-to-date with the key issues facing 5G.